How to persuade someone to pick up your leaflets

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Image via Flickr creative commons from Abi Skipp

Getting customers into your shop is enough of a challenge, but once they’re in there you have to ensure that you entice them to buy as much as possible. These tactics become increasingly important at times when consumers are strapped for cash and reluctant to spend – as has been the case for the last few years. Distributing leaflets can help to provide customers with useful additional information about certain products, so it might be a good idea to distribute leaflets concerning ranges of items you’re particularly keen to sell. However, there’s obviously quite a lot you need to think about if you’re to get the results you want.

Firstly, it helps to think about where and how you intend to display your poems. You need to consider purchasing point-of-sale display items – you can find an extensive selection at UKPOS – and make sure you place these leaflets in positions where they’re likely to catch the eye of the customer. However, you also need to give very careful thought to the actual design of the leaflets for maximum effect. Obviously, you need to strike the balance between having an accessible design and being genuinely informative. This is tougher than it might sound, but with a bit of careful consideration you get the right results.

An article from eHow.com offers some useful tips in this regard. It points out that as you may not know exactly who your audience is likely to be, you need to keep things simple, short, and to the point. However, you should also remember that shoppers are likely to encounter rather a lot of this sort of material – so unless you find a way of making it instantly interesting to them, they may simply ignore it.

Obviously, you need to give very careful thought to the design of your leaflet. This means that you need to keep the content snappy and also that you need to ensure it doesn’t end up simply looking cluttered. Images can be useful and eye-catching, but if your leaflet looks too busy it may fail to capture people’s attention. It’s also a good idea to print colour leaflets instead of black-and-white ones. The use of colour can really be effective in catching the shopper’s eye, as well as making the overall appearance of the leaflet look sharper. Black-and-white leaflets, on the other hand, can appear somewhat smudged and indistinct.

According to Distribooter.co.uk, a call to action can also be useful when you’re designing a leaflet. For example, if you’re promoting a discount then you need to ensure you make this clear. This is far more likely to boost sales. It’s also important to ensure that you check and double-check the design of your leaflet before you go ahead and print. Obvious typographical errors and other design mistakes aren’t just embarrassing; they can also make your whole business appear that bit less professional. This is why you need to go over your leaflet with a fine toothcomb and make sure that no such errors appear.

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